Anti-Money Laundering

Committee Advances Bill to Target Financing of Human Trafficking

House Financial Services Committee Votes Unanimously in Favor of the End Banking for Human Traffickers Act of 2017 (H.R.2219)

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The U.S. House Financial Services Committee on Wednesday voted unanimously to advance legislation targeting the financing of human trafficking, in a move welcomed by the Financial Accountability and Corporate Transparency (FACT) Coalition.

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Letter to Reps. Hensarling and Waters Supporting End Banking for Human Traffickers Act (H.R.2219)

The Financial Accountability and Corporate Transparency Coalition (FACT Coalition) sent a letter to House Financial Services Committee Chairman Jeb Hensarling and Ranking Member Maxine Waters in support of the bipartisan End Banking for Human Traffickers Act of 2017 (H.R.2219), which would increase the role of financial policymakers and the financial industry in combating human trafficking.

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Letter to Sens. Grassley and Feinstein Supporting S.1241

The Financial Accountability and Corporate Transparency Coalition (FACT Coalition) sent a letter to Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck Grassley and Ranking Member Dianne Feinstein in support of the Combating Money Laundering, Terrorist Financing, and Counterfeiting Act of 2017 (S.1241).  The full letter can be read below or downloaded here.

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New Report: Anti-Money Laundering Efforts Near Failure

Former Treasury Agent Urges Authorities to Target the Drivers of Human Trafficking, Drug Smuggling, and Corruption

Ending Anonymous Companies; Trade Transparency Units; Holding Gatekeepers Accountable Among Policy Recommendations

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Worldwide anti-money laundering efforts are currently just a decimal point away from total failure, according to a new report published Tuesday by the FACT Coalition.

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Countering International Money Laundering

Worldwide anti-money laundering efforts are currently just a decimal point away from total failure, according to this August 2017 report published by the Financial Accountability and Corporate Transparency Coalition (FACT Coalition).

Authored by former Treasury Special Agent John Cassara, an internationally renown expert on financial crime, the study details the near failure of current efforts to combat money laundering and the rationale for comprehensive reform.

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FinCEN Real Estate Effort Underscores Need to End Anonymous Companies

Statement by the FACT Coalition on Treasury Department Decision to Renew and Expand Geographic Targeting Orders to Identify Buyers in Luxury Real Estate

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN), a branch of the U.S. Treasury Department, announced Tuesday that it was renewing and expanding its temporary orders seeking to uncover illicit activity in the luxury real estate sector.

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Bipartisan Bill Seeks to Secure Airways from Criminals and Terrorists

FACT Coalition Supports ‘Aircraft Ownership Transparency Act of 2017’

WASHINGTON, D.C. — A bipartisan group of lawmakers introduced a bill Friday to secure the U.S. aviation system from criminal actors and terrorists hiding behind anonymous shell companies, in a move welcomed by the Financial Accountability and Corporate Transparency Coalition.

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Joint Letter from 44 Organizations Supporting the TITLE Act (S.1454)

The Financial Accountability and Corporate Transparency Coalition (FACT Coalition)  joined 43 other organizations to send a letter to Sens. Whitehouse, Grassley, and Feinstein supporting the True Incorporation Transparency for Law Enforcement (TITLE) Act [S. 1454], which would require companies to disclose information about the real people who own or control them (often called the “beneficial owners”) at the time they are created.

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On First Anniversary of Panama Papers Release, What Have We Learned?

By Gary Kalman

This week marks the anniversary of the Panama Papers, a leak of more than 11 million documents exposing widespread corruption and illicit financing involving 140 public officials in more than 50 countries around the globe.  The leak, large as it was, included documents from just one law firm and had reverberations worldwide.  The impact was profound, but was it enough?  And what did we learn?

For those not steeped in money laundering practices and illicit financial flows, the Panama Papers showed the world how it all works.  If you want to finance terror; steal from taxpayers; traffic in humans, weapons, or drugs; or evade taxes, anonymous shell companies are the vehicle of choice.  The Panamanian law firm Mossack Fonseca showed that these entities were easy to set up, inexpensive to maintain, and able to provide legal secrecy even if covering up underlying illegal activity.

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